HRY SPACE To Host Nova Prize Exhibition From FRESCO Collective

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HRY Space is proud to sponsor the venue for FRESCO Collective’s upcoming Nova Prize exhibition titled “POSTMODERN MIASMAS: RESPONSES TO THE URBAN BODY AT LISPENARD’S MEADOW” from March 1st 2019 to March 7th 2019.

The exhibition will open with a public reception from 5:30PM to 8:45PM on March 1st 2019. To RSVP please contact HELLO@HRY-SPACE.WORK

The FRESCO Collective develops research projects and public programs that examine marginalized fields within contemporary visual culture. Through its initiatives, the organization aims to bridge the divide between artists, researchers, critics, collectors, and the general public in order to facilitate direct, meaningful engagement with works of art, and promote critical discussion on urgent topics.

FRESCO Collective is part of the FRESCO Foundation, a New York-based 501 (c)(3) non-profit organization devoted to expanding public accessibility to art. The Foundation specifically supports innovative artistic endeavors, with a focus on socially engaged art and the intersection of art and technology.

The FRESCO Collective is pleased to present a group exhibition of seven emerging artists selected for the 2019 Nova Prize:

Abe Abraham
Mengfan Bai
Eero Jääskeläinen
Minju Kim
Yusuf Can Kulak
Kerstin Paillard
Lily Reeves

The title stems from the history of the exhibition site, which was once a marsh known as Lispenard’s Meadow. Through a range of media, Abe Abraham, Mengfan Bai, Eero Jääskeläinen, Minju Kim, Yusuf Can Kulak, Kerstin Paillard, and Lily Reeves thoughtfully reflect on human origins, civilization’s violent transformation of nature to forge the built environment, and attendant socio-environmental ailments linked to the embodied, postmodern urban experience.

Each artist contributes a layer to the ongoing discussions surrounding these larger concerns. Abe Abraham’s rhythmic video Salt Water presents a highly synchronized mass of flesh and muscle that speaks to the life-giving force of water, and comments on humanity’s path between order and entropy, all while lulling viewers into a trance-like state. Like Abraham’s absorbing video, Minju Kim’s saturated painting Mechanical Flesh R1 draws viewers into its swirling red and gold mass while calling attention to the fragility of the human condition, and how the subconscious acts as a guiding impulse on the precarious journey between life and death. In Northern Lights I, Kerstin Paillard similarly offers a painterly meditation on the human psyche, drawing upon her experiences with the landscapes of Sweden and France. Paillard’s work is meant to facilitate individual introspection through the use of abstract, haptic forms. Like Abraham and Kim, she is interested in ideas of interiority and how the individual relates to the collective in an increasingly isolated world.

Whereas Paillard’s abstract composition encourages critical examination of self through accretions of pastel and crushed pigment, Lily Reeves utilizes video and the arresting allure of neon to probe comparable themes. Neverending in All Directions calls attention to how the body has historically been a site of projection for human desires, aspirations, and expectations. Based on her personal engagement with the practices, ceremonies, and rites of native tribes of the American Southwest, Reeves positions indigenous belief systems as one way of ameliorating Western civilization’s understanding of the individual body and the planet more broadly.

In Infinity, Eero Jääskeläinen has photographically registered and abstracted the ubiquitous and frenetic energy of the contemporary urban body. While Jääskeläinen’s photograph might be seen as uncritical, Yusuf Can Kulak’s ceramic sculpture Systematic Chaos offers a starkly different view. Can Kulak’s small ovoid sculpture speaks to vexing concerns about urban surveillance—part and parcel of the larger discourse on imposing order on the built environment. Likewise, Mengfan Bai’s austere oil painting Glass House serves as a pictorial elaboration on many of the motifs broached by Can Kulak, such as the relationship between architecture, power, control, navigation of space, and the myriad forces acting upon bodies in urban settings.

Overall, these artists explore interrelated themes about the conditions of the urban environment; the deteriorating relationship between civilization and nature; the body as a site of trauma and healing; and the role for mysticism as a potential collective antidote in a progressively violent contemporary landscape. A small selection of works by Takashi Murakami, Virgil Abloh, Daniel Arsham, Sam Friedman, Cleon Peterson, and Josh Sperling will also be on display in the exhibition venue. While separate from the exhibition, the proximity of these works encourages visual and intellectual comparison between the sets of emerging and established artists while augmenting the overall exhibition narrative.

The exhibition is curated by Anthony Huffman with assistance from Baylee McKeel, Renata Baltar, and Jennifer Gutierrez. A private panel discussion with art historians, curators, and cultural producers will immediately follow the opening reception. For more information, please contact Anthony Huffman at: program@frescocollective.org

Exhibition Dates: March 1 – 7, 11:00 am – 5:00 pm

The FRESCO Collective graciously acknowledges HRY for providing the exhibition space.

2019 Nova Prize Open Call & Exhibition

This exhibition is the result of an open call process which sought submissions from emerging artists that could offer innovative perspectives on pressing contemporary issues. After receiving a robust global response from more than 20 countries, an international jury composed of artists, scholars, and curators selected the exhibiting artists whose practice and themes most align with the spirit of the call.

FRESCO Collective

The FRESCO Collective develops research projects and public programs that examine marginalized fields within contemporary visual culture. Through its initiatives, the organization aims to bridge the divide between artists, researchers, critics, collectors, and the general public in order to facilitate direct, meaningful engagement with works of art, and promote critical discussion on urgent topics. FRESCO Collective is part of the FRESCO Foundation, a New York-based 501 (c)(3) non-profit organization devoted to expanding public accessibility to art. The Foundation specifically supports innovative artistic endeavors, with a focus on socially engaged art and the intersection of art and technology.

HRY Group